Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Wikis’ Category

The LIS Wiki is a great encyclopedia by librarians, for librarians and it has an entry on Library 2.0 which is always being updated and serves as a good primer for those new to the term Library 2.0 and all its various meanings.

Read Full Post »

A couple of social networking blogs that caught my attention tonight. One is from a colleague over at the University of Rochester who actually attended my workshop last week. Cynthia’s blog is Long time listener, first time caller — I love the title! Cynthia works in IT at the library and is doing much the same thing as me — collecting lots of good library & web 2.0 gadgets and tools and taking them back to her institution and teaching others. The second one is called Mashable! The Social Networking Blog and I found it through Cynthia’s blog. Mashable has lots of great widgets and code for inserting into your blogs, websites and social networking apps like MySpace and YouTube.

Read Full Post »

Today I teach the Blogs, Podcasts and Wikis workshop at RRLC in Rochester.  Participants are from the Rochester, NY region and come from public, special, academic, school and medical libraries.  Tell me what you hope to gain or learn from this workshop!

Read Full Post »

It appears that wikis are changing the way we communicate. Although not a revelation to many of us (and, dare I mention, wikis are not revolutionary, its the way we use them that is new and different) , the mainstream media is picking up this theme and running with it. I love the following comment:

The United Nations, notorious for endless deliberations, is trying a technological quick fix. Its Global Compact Office, which promotes corporate responsibility, has embraced a once fringe social technology—the wiki—in hopes that it will help staff in 80 countries share information and reach consensus with less deliberation and more speed.

Wikis go mainstream. I wonder if it will be anything like how blogging hit the mainstream a couple of years ago and made an impression on such warhorses as CNN, who now broadcast a segment with two women “reporters” who sit and show the television audience how the blogosphere is covering major stories. Probably not, but worth mentioning.

Read Full Post »

This very cool story about the Public Library of Charlotte & Mecklenburg County gives me hope for libraries and relevancy in the 21st century!  The IT director charged her staffers with finding and using Web 2.0 technologies in the course of their jobs.  The results? They developed a program called Learning 2.0 which is being adopted by libraries around the country to insert Web 2.0 tools into their workflow and their outreach to communities.  Way cool!

Read Full Post »

Michael Stephens is writing a follow-up to his Web 2.0 article which was in last year’s Library Technology Reports.  In it, he describes a recent report written by the director of South Carolina’s statewide library services, which, details libraries’ and librarians’ use of emerging tools such as blogs and IM before and after statewide technology workshops….”.  As many as 60% of the libraries who participated were planning on incorporating some sort of emerging technologies into their upcoming technology plans.  Read more on the ALA TechSource blog.

60% is a huge number!  I wonder if this is comparable in other states and whether it could just be a passing fad?  The impressive numbers came after these statewide tech workshops when the momentum is high for participants to use what they have just learned.  It will be interesting to track this and see what happens down the road in a year.

Read Full Post »

The Future of the Book website has just released CommentPress 1.o, a free, open source theme for the WordPress blog engine designed to allow paragraph-by-paragraph commenting in the margins of a text. I’m overjoyed to see this, as I am a firm believer in blogs as easier tools to use and manage than wikis. It would be so much simpler to manage collaborative writing projects with this tool, as opposed to wikis which seem to have a huge upfront cost in terms of learning syntax and maintaining backend support.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »