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Archive for the ‘Blogs’ Category

Edublog Award winners

Kathryn Greenhill writes about the 2007 Edublog Award winners on her blog, Librarians Matter…

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Good post on Infoblog about best Web 2.0 practices and the library catalog.  The idea of cross-promotion within the library by way of library catalog is a good use of Web 2.0 technologies to manufacture interest in the library and what we are doing.

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Today I have been thinking a lot about book discussions and libraries, particularly academic libraries.  My library is sponsoring a faculty book discussion next week, around the book The View From the Center of the Universe, and it got me thinking about why my library doesn’t do more book discussion projects.  Time is, of course, the first reason which comes to mind.  But it shouldn’t be that hard considering we are an academic library and have access to great material and a faculty who are generally fond of the library and the programming we provide.   Laura Cohen writes about adding value to the library; not just through marketing our collections, but also through engaging users in social and participatory websites that discuss books.  One example she uses is the creation of discussion blogs revolving around campus reading programs or visiting writers.  A library website or blog is the perfect place to start these virtual discussions.  People recognize the word “library” and may have an old-fashioned idea about our mission or may see us as just dusty warehouses of books.  Since people are going to the web for book discussions, shouldn’t we be there when go looking?

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Meredith Farkas writes about successful blogging over at Information Wants to Be Free:

What makes your blog a success depends on what your goals for it are. Why do you blog? Looking at the responses I saw in the Survey of the Biblioblogosphere, I didn’t see anything about having the most subscribers, having the highest Google Page Rank, or being the most well-known blogger. I saw people who wanted to share information with others, who want to keep current, who want to become part of a community and who want to process their own ideas about professional issues. So, if you want to share information with others, it’s probably important to have an audience, but it probably doesn’t matter as much how many comments you get or how many people link to you. If your goal in blogging is to keep yourself current or to process your own ideas about professional issues, popularity shouldn’t matter at all. If your goal is to be part of a community, it shouldn’t matter how big or small that community is, but you may care about things like “conversational intensity” because you want to be a part of the community conversation. So, think about why you blog and let that guide your vision of success.

I emphasize “share information with others” because I think this is what makes librarians so important. So much of what we do is intended to create access to information: we collect, organize and disseminate information to users and I think this why so many librarians have taken naturally to blogging. Its a perfect fit for so many of us.

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Jenny Levine describes the Google application for offline access to the Google newsreader on her blog. In a nutshell,

Basically, Google Gears is code that anyone can embed in their online tools to make them available offline. It’s integrated into Google Reader via a one-time install that doesn’t even require you to restart your browser. Once activated, a little icon appears in the upper right-hand corner, green for online, purple for offline.

Perfect for those who have downtime between Internet access points…

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A couple of social networking blogs that caught my attention tonight. One is from a colleague over at the University of Rochester who actually attended my workshop last week. Cynthia’s blog is Long time listener, first time caller — I love the title! Cynthia works in IT at the library and is doing much the same thing as me — collecting lots of good library & web 2.0 gadgets and tools and taking them back to her institution and teaching others. The second one is called Mashable! The Social Networking Blog and I found it through Cynthia’s blog. Mashable has lots of great widgets and code for inserting into your blogs, websites and social networking apps like MySpace and YouTube.

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Today I teach the Blogs, Podcasts and Wikis workshop at RRLC in Rochester.  Participants are from the Rochester, NY region and come from public, special, academic, school and medical libraries.  Tell me what you hope to gain or learn from this workshop!

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